WWW’2010 – Stop Thinking, Start Tagging: Tag Semantics Emerge From Collaborative Verbosity

12 02 2010

I want to share the abstract of our upcoming paper at WWW’2010 (here is a link to the full paper). In case you are interested in our research and going to WWW in Raleigh this year as well, I’d be happy if you’d get in touch.

C. Körner, D. Benz, A. Hotho, M. Strohmaier, G. Stumme, Stop Thinking, Start Tagging: Tag Semantics Emerge From Collaborative Verbosity, 19th International World Wide Web Conference (WWW2010), Raleigh, NC, USA, April 26-30, ACM, 2010.

Abstract: Recent research provides evidence for the presence of emergent semantics in collaborative tagging systems. While several methods have been proposed, little is known about the factors that influence the evolution of semantic structures in these systems. A natural hypothesis is that the quality of the emergent semantics depends on the pragmatics of tagging: Users with certain usage patterns might contribute more to the resulting semantics than others. In this work, we propose several measures which enable a pragmatic differentiation of taggers by their degree of contribution to emerging semantic structures. We distinguish between categorizers, who typically use a small set of tags as a replacement for hierarchical classification schemes, and describers, who are annotating resources with a wealth of freely associated, descriptive keywords. To study our hypothesis, we apply semantic similarity measures to 64 different partitions of a real-world and large-scale folksonomy containing different ratios of categorizers and describers. Our results not only show that ‘verbose’ taggers are most useful for the emergence  of tag semantics, but also that a subset containing only 40% of the most ‘verbose’ taggers can produce results that match and even outperform the semantic precision obtained from the whole dataset. Moreover, the results suggest that there exists a causal link between the pragmatics of tagging and resulting emergent semantics. This work is relevant for designers and analysts of tagging systems interested (i) in fostering the semantic development of their platforms, (ii) in identifying users introducing “semantic noise”, and (iii) in learning ontologies.

More details can be found in the full paper.

This work is funded in part by the Know-Center and the FWF Research Grant TransAgere. It is the result of a collaboration with the KDE group at University of Kassel and the  University of Würzburg. You might  also want to have a look at a related blog post on the bibsonomy blog.

Some background about the distinction between categorizers and describers can be found in a related paper:

M. Strohmaier, C. Koerner, R. Kern, Why do Users Tag? Detecting Users’ Motivation for Tagging in Social Tagging Systems, 4th International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (ICWSM2010), Washington, DC, USA, May 23-26, 2010. (Download pdf)








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